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Atomic Accidents A History Of Nuclear Meltdowns And Disasters Pdf

atomic accidents a history of nuclear meltdowns and disasters pdf

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — Atomic Accidents by James Mahaffey. Radiation: What could go wrong? In short, plenty.

From Marie Curie carrying around a vial of radium salt because she liked the pretty blue glow to the large-scale disasters at Chernobyl and Fukushima, dating back to the late nineteenth century, nuclear science has had a rich history of innovative exploration and discovery, coupled with mistakes, accidents, and downright disasters.

In this lively book, long-time advocate of continued nuclear research and nuclear energy James Mahaffey looks at each incident in turn and analyzes what happened and why, often discovering where scientists went wrong when analyzing past meltdowns.

Every incident, while taking its toll, has led to new understanding of the mighty atom—and the fascinating frontier of science that still holds both incredible risk and great promise. Get A Copy. Published February 4th by Pegasus Books first published January 1st More Details Other Editions Friend Reviews.

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Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 4. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Mahaffey goes all the way and delivers the goods: most authors might be content to reference the urban legend that the AMF "candlepin" bowling pin spotter was inspired by fuel rod management technology from the Fermi-1, but Mahaffey is there with patent dates and part numbers.

Mahaffey graduated my alma mater Georgia Tech , and we both worked at the Georgia Tech Research Institute, though not at the same time.

View all 4 comments. So I'll probably get back to it, unless the library calls it back first Nope, someone else wants it. Looking at my notes: Mahaffey says keeping accidents secret always makes things worse.

This was particularly evident in the old USSR, where admitting a mistake could cost you literally your life. Or your job, and a free trip to Siberia! Lots of gory details, almost all involving experienced people ignoring safety guidelines because Well, because. As we already have in Calif, and the Germans, and The remarkable density of politicians, and stubornness of the so-called Greens, were mentioned. I will add, 'Against stupidity, the Gods themselves rage in vain. Rated at 11 megatons, it weighed around 82 tons, and would fit barely in the bomb bay of a specially modified B "Peacemaker".

It was the size of a large Airstream trailer. Five were built. Fortunately, no calls for its use were received. Basically a "how-to" primer, many, many orders were received from the USSR.

Many helpful photos were added in the edition. It went through 8 editions and was published in 40 languages. No mention of the careful reasoning behind this unprecedented show of openness, for what hd been a carefully if ineffectively guarded military secret. It's been a long time since I've read non-fiction that kept drawing me back to see "what happens next" but Atomic is totally that book. The subject matter helps - nearly every recorded radiological mishap and disaster, both famous and little-known.

Mahaffey leads us through each, carefully explaining isotopes and reactions in ways that neit It's been a long time since I've read non-fiction that kept drawing me back to see "what happens next" but Atomic is totally that book. Mahaffey leads us through each, carefully explaining isotopes and reactions in ways that neither make you feel stupid nor dumb down the material. He states his biases right in the introduction: The purpose of this book is not to convince you that nuclear power is unsafe beyond reason On the contrary, I hope to demonstrate that nuclear power is even safer than transportation by steam and may be one of the key things that will allow life on Earth to keep progressing; but please form your own conclusions.

I think he's done a great job of this - I come away from the book thinking that nuclear power has great potential but man, we need to find a way to engineer human stupidity out of it.

Whether it's worth the try is left up to the reader. I cannot review this book without mentioning the footnotes - don't skip them! Some are more information or links to videos, and others are tidbits that are awesome but wouldn't fit anywhere else.

For example: It is difficult to find a cross-section view of the Fermi 1 reactor that does not have a big X drawn through the refueling car.

It was not a popular accessory. I leave you to find the geek joke on your own. View all 7 comments. Mar 08, Hiawatha Bray rated it really liked it. At once highly technical and highly entertaining, this history of nuclear accidents comes from a guy who, like me, is a fan of nuclear power. But he's not blind to its flaws or to the inevitable failings of the humans who operate nuke plants. Fans of technology history books will love this one. I totally loved this book, which sounds odd considering the topic; but it is so educational, diligently researched, and well-written that it is actually entertaining.

As a child of the Korean Conflict and Cold War, anything atomic has always been a hot topic of intrigue for me. The author's research has been exceptionally wide-ranging, and I feel as if I've just finished a year's university course in the topic; that's how much I've learned.

This book was fascinating, thorough, and a keeper. Read this with "Command and Control" if you want a complete look at accidents involving nuclear technology on both civilian and military sides.

The recounting of early work and experiments with radioactivity was compelling in a gruesome, morbid way. Could not even finish this book! It was too dull and boring. I was only on the fourth chapter and didn't know how I got there or what had happened in between. I had high hopes for this book since it had a 4. This is a highly readable account of the history of atomic power as seen through its accidents and safety failures.

That might sound like it's anti-nuclear power, but in fact Mahaffey is a long-time advocate. His major point is that in fact significant accidents are fairly rare, and that with a few notable exceptions, serious casualties are even rarer. His account starts with a bizarre episode in the Ozarks in the late 19th century, with the accidental discovery of what eventually proved to be a This is a highly readable account of the history of atomic power as seen through its accidents and safety failures.

His account starts with a bizarre episode in the Ozarks in the late 19th century, with the accidental discovery of what eventually proved to be a radium mine. I will say that the discussion of radium and its various uses, not just for night-glow dials but its medical uses, both science-based and as "mineral water," is by itself worth the price of admission.

As he takes us through the development of the bomb, and the first reactors to produce bomb-grade material, and then the development of peaceful nuclear power, there are stories both terrifying and delightful. Initially, everything had to be learned the hard way. The most terrifying detail, to my mind, is that for years the US military tried to develop nuclear-powered military aircraft. Surely they would never crash Fortunately, that proved to be a technical bridge too far, and the program was cancelled.

A recurring theme is that while all of the power-plant and bomb transport accidents involved designs that failed to anticipate a potential technological vulnerability, the power plant accidents only became disasters when one worker or another overrode the automatic controls, often for what seemed like logical reasons. There's also discussion of how politcal and economic factors played into decisions, as well as the inertia of sticking with a known design that's been reliable and effective, even though there may be better designs and paths not followed, that might make nuclear power safer, more reliable, and less unsettling for a concerned public.

He does repeatedly hit a favorite theme of mine, the ways in which excessive secrecy to prevent public panic in fact fed public fear that there were dangers they weren't being informed about.

All in all, this was an interesting and enjoyable read, or rather in this case enjoyable listen, and Tom Weiner captures exactly the right tone in his reading of it.

Highly recommended. I bought this book. Aug 29, Nicole rated it it was ok Shelves: nonfiction. This book didn't really work for me.

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A nuclear and radiation accident is defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency IAEA as "an event that has led to significant consequences to people, the environment or the facility. Examples include lethal effects to individuals , large radioactivity release to the environment, reactor core melt. The impact of nuclear accidents has been a topic of debate since the first nuclear reactors were constructed in , and has been a key factor in public concern about nuclear facilities. Nuclear-powered submarine accidents include the K , K , K , K , K , K , and K [11] [13] [14] accidents. The IAEA maintains a website reporting recent nuclear accidents. The worst nuclear accident to date was the Chernobyl disaster which occurred in in Ukraine. A study published in by the World Health Organization estimates that there may eventually be up to 4, additional cancer deaths related to the accident among those exposed to significant radiation levels.

Account Options Sign in. Top charts. New arrivals. Switch to the audiobook. Radiation: What could go wrong? In short, plenty. From Marie Curie carrying around a vial of radium salt because she liked the pretty blue glow to the large-scale disasters at Chernobyl and Fukushima, dating back to the late nineteenth century, nuclear science has had a rich history of innovative exploration and discovery, coupled with mistakes, accidents, and downright disasters.


different conclusions. In Atomic Accidents, James Mahaffey tries Atomic Accidents: A History of Nuclear. Meltdowns and Disasters from the Ozark. Mountains to.


The Economic Assessment of the Cost of Nuclear Accidents

Chapter 4. The experiment did not disappoint, as it sent the contents of the reactor vessel flying.

5 Comments

  1. Brendan A.

    15.12.2020 at 10:42
    Reply

    The United States Government Accountability Office reported more than incidents from to of nuclear plants not performing within acceptable safety guidelines.

  2. Learco L.

    16.12.2020 at 17:35
    Reply

    In relation to nuclear power, safety is closely linked with security, and in the nuclear field also with safeguards.

  3. Niobe B.

    18.12.2020 at 16:05
    Reply

    eBook features: Highlight, take notes, and search in the book; Length: pages; Word Wise: Enabled; Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled; Page Flip: Enabled.

  4. Isabel R.

    19.12.2020 at 17:28
    Reply

    Read Atomic Accidents PDF - A History of Nuclear Meltdowns and Disasters; From the Ozark Mountains to Fukushima Ebook by James.

  5. Nablekele1995

    20.12.2020 at 20:55
    Reply

    Has Atomic Accidents by James Mahaffey been sitting on your reading list?

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